Work-from-Home Scams

Be part of one of America's Fastest Growing Industries.
Be the Boss!
Earn thousands of dollars a month from home!

Ads like this are everywhere — from the telephone pole on the corner to your newspaper, email and favorite websites. The jobs might be different, but the message is the same — start earning a great living today working from home, even in your spare time.

When money's tight, work-at-home opportunities can sound like just the thing to make ends meet. Some even promise a refund if you don't succeed. But the reality is many of these jobs are scams. The con artists peddling them may get you to pay for starter kits or certifications that are useless, and may even charge your credit card without permission.

Others just don't deliver on their promises. The ads don't tell you that you may have to work a lot of hours without pay, or they don't disclose all the costs you might incur — say, for placing newspaper ads, making photocopies, or buying the envelopes, paper, stamps and other supplies you need to do the job. People tricked by these ads have lost thousands of dollars, not to mention time and energy.

Get Answers in Writing

Legitimate work-at-home program sponsors should tell you — in writing — what's involved in the program they're selling. Here are some questions to ask:

  • What tasks will I have to perform? (Ask the program sponsor to list every step of the job.)
  • Will I be paid a salary or will I be paid on commission?
  • What is the basis for your claims about my likely earnings? Do you survey everyone who purchased the program? What documents can you show me to prove your claims are true before I give you any money?
  • Who will pay me?
  • When will I get my first paycheck?
  • What is the total cost of this work-at-home program, including supplies, equipment and membership fees? What will I get for my money?

The answers to these questions may help you determine whether a work-at-home program is legitimate, and if so, whether it's a good fit for you.

When it comes to business opportunities, there are no sure bets. Promises of a big income for work from home, especially when the "opportunity" involves an up-front fee or divulging your credit card information, should make you very suspicious. It doesn't matter if the ad shows up in a trusted newspaper or website — or if the people you talk to on the phone sound legitimate. The situation demands both research and skepticism.

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